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Authentic Confederate Manufactured or Used Swords and Firearms of the Civil War
Firearms
Rare State of Virginia Conversion of an 1823 Valley Forge Musket From Richmond
Item #: A5294
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What a great untouched weapon! This is one that I wish could talk. it is the .69 caliber military musket that was made by the firm of Evans in Valley Forge. It has the remnants of their markings on the lockplate to go along with the droop wing style eagle and the 1822 production date. When this gun came out it was originally a flintlock musket. When the Civil War broke out flintlock muskets were obsolete and that is where this one gets interesting and special. As you can see it has a very large bolster added to the side to make it serviceable as a percussion weapon. In the book on Confederate Rifles and Muskets by Murphy and Madaus, they tell how this is one of the ones that were converted in Richmond, Virginia during 1861 or 1862 by the firm known, ironically, as the Union Manufacturing Company. They state that this company provided at least 2,919 for the state of Virginia during the first 2 years of the War when weapons for the Confederacy were so direly needed. They also did some work directly for the Confederacy but the records aren't as clear about what that work entailed. Since none of their products are signed we have to look at the traits and markings to know who was the conversion specialist. In the book they state that they used Arabic numbers on their alterations and this one has these numbers on the metal parts. It has the "662" number stamped on the inside of the hammer as well as the large "U" for the Union Manufacturing Company. This number also appears on the remnants of the brass flash pan from the flintlock system. When they converted the gun to percussion this company used a very distinctive bolster system. They have the large bolster with the clean out screw on the side. The barrel is still full-length at 42 inches and it has an ancient dark tone all over like the rest of the gun. Underneath the gun it has an old wooden ramrod in the channel and the rear sling swivel swivel is still intact. The action of the lockplate still catches on both positions. The stock of the gun was trimmed down eons ago to the place that would have been just in front of the rear barrel band. They replaced that barrel ban with a hand formed piece of flat brass and the brass has a cool ancient tone. What remains of the stock is a very beautiful piece of dark walnut wood that displays superbly as you can see. This is a whole lot of gun and is almost surely Confederate converted and doesn't cost tens of thousands of dollars.

Shipping Weight: 30 lbs
$1,450.00 USD

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