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Authentic Confederate Manufactured or Used Swords and Firearms of the Civil War
Firearms
7th Tennessee Cavalry Battalion Identified Colt From the Hank Jr. Collection
Item #: A149
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You always hear about how the Confederates loves using the .36 Colt revolvers when they could get one. This is one of those cases. This gun was carried by William C. Patterson who served in the Confederate 7th Tennessee Cavalry Battalion. I have known of this gun for about 20 years. It came into the collecting community by well known collector Bill Rasp of Jackson, Tennessee. He sold the gun to a fellow collector in Kentucky named Phil Gardner. I purchased the gun from him in early 2001. It was one of the first pieces that I sold to Country Music Legend, Hank Williams, Jr. It has been in his collection since that time. He decided he would let it go, so here is your opportunity to own a wonderful Confederate used piece from a famous collection. As for the gun itself, it is the famous model 1851 Colt revolver known as the "Navy" model revolver. This one is in great untouched condition. It has a pretty and mostly smooth dark brown patina surface all over. It has all matching production numbers of 115,670 including the original wedge. These serial numbers let us know that the gun would have been manufactured in 1861. The top of the barrel has the vividly clear one line maker's mark that reads "ADDRESS SAMl COLT NEW-YORK CITY U.S. AMERICA". These guns were manufactured in Hartford, Connecticut with the sale office being located in New York City. The side of the frame and the cylinder has the clear "COLTS PATENT" stamp still visible. The cylinder of this gun has about 40% of the original navy battle scene still visible. The scene shows up better in person than it does in the images. The action works on all positions. The backstrap and triggerguard are in excellent shape and they each have a beautiful golden tone to the brass. On the handle of the gun it has the original 1-piece walnut wood grips. On the bottom of the grip strap it has the initials "W.C.P" scratched into the brass. These are initials of the owner William C. Patterson. The records show that Patterson in the 7th Tennessee Cavalry Battalion on November 15th 1861. They served in Middle Tennessee for most of their service. Patterson is listed as a Brevet Lieutenant in the 7th. HIs resignation was approved by General Beauregard at Tupelo, Mississippi in June of 1862. In his pension papers, his wife stated he was wounded at the Battle of Shiloh but I haven't been able to verify that and neither was the pension board. It also notes that he served with the 2nd Tennessee Infantry. The gun is accompanied by the original leather holster as well as the original leather belt. These pieces were with the revolver when they were initially found. The holster has the buggy style finial intact. When I first owned the piece it had the ink inscription "7th Tenn Cav. BN" visible on the inside of the flap. It has been opened and closed many time when Hank would show the gun off so now the marking is only very faintly visible. The belt is made of this leather with the simple "D" pattern iron buckle. It is entirely likely that these pieces were made in Memphis because I have seen Leech & Rigdon produced products in similar belts and holsters. The set is accompanied by a nice bit of research on Patterson and the 7th Tennessee Cavalry Battalion. It also has the paperwork that I sent to Hank back in 2001. This is a wonderful, honest piece of Confederate used weaponry.

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